Contributor Weekend: One-Hour Video

It’s time for our second global contributor weekend, and this time we’re focusing on the video team. For this month’s challenge, in honor of it being our second month, you have two options for how you can participate! The challenge for this month overall is to work with at least one hour worth of WordCamp video, which you can do by either creating subtitles or editing the video file in preparation for upload to WordPress.tv.

One of the great things about contributing to the video team is that you get to learn so much, since all the work basically involves watching WordCamp presentation videos. Subtitling is a doubly important need, as it is needed to make all those WordCamp videos accessible to people who are deaf or hard of hearing and can’t listen to the audio track, as well as making it possible for the videos to be consumed (in some cases after subtitle translation) by people who speak different languages.

The challenge will last from Saturday, February 27, 2016 through Sunday, February 28, 2016, and the results will be reviewed afterward by members of the video team. If you enjoy the challenge, the video team would be very excited to welcome you into their ranks! Interested? Here’s how to participate.

What About Last Month?

In January, the inaugural contributor weekend was focused on the support forums. That challenge had 73 participants, including 10 people who provided 20 or more correct answers to open support threads, thereby winning the challenge. Congratulations to Harris Anastasiadis, Ahmad Awais, Takis Bouyouris, Phil Erb, Eric Gunawan, Jackie McBride, Diana Nichols, Kostas Nicolacopoulos, Juhi Saxena, and Sarah Semark! To them and to everyone else who participated, thank you so much for your efforts. Every answer helps, and over the course of this contributor weekend, these amazing volunteers responded to 800 support threads. The support forums queue of requests with no replies went from 28 pages to 7 pages — that was an incredible success, of which every participant was a part!

So head on over to see how to get involved with the one-hour video challenge this weekend, and help us make next month’s post just as impressive! ?

Experiment: WordCamp Incubator

WordCamps are locally-organized WordPress conferences that happen all over the world (and are so fun). Sometimes people don’t realize that WordCamps are organized by local volunteers rather than a central organization, and they contact us asking, “Can you bring WordCamp to my city?” When this happens, we always suggest they start with a meetup group, and think about organizing a WordCamp themselves after their group has been active for a few months. We emphasize that WordCamps are locally-organized events, not something that the central community team plans from afar.

This has been successful in many areas — there are currently 241 meetup groups on our meetup.com chapter program! In some regions, though, enthusiastic volunteers have had more of a challenge getting things started. Because of this, we’re going to try an experiment this year called the WordCamp Incubator.

The intention of the incubator program is to help spread WordPress to underserved areas through providing more significant organizing support for a first event. In practical terms, this experiment means we’ll be choosing three cities in 2016 where there is not an active WordPress community — but where it seems like there is a lot of potential and where there are some people excited to become organizers — and will help to organize their first WordCamp. These WordCamps will be small, one-day, one-track events geared toward the goal of generating interest and getting people involved in creating an ongoing local community.*

So, where should we do these three events?  If you have always wanted a WordCamp in your city but haven’t been able to get a meetup group going, this is a great opportunity. We will be taking applications for the next week, then will get in touch with everyone who applied to discuss the possibilities. We will announce the  cities chosen by the end of March.

To apply, fill in the application by February 26, 2016. You don’t need to have any specific information handy, it’s just a form to let us know you’re interested. You can apply to nominate your city even if you don’t want to be the main organizer, but for this experiment  we will need local liaisons and volunteers, so please only nominate cities where you live or work so that we have at least one local connection to begin.

Thanks, and good luck!

For the record, that describes the ideal first WordCamp even if you have an active meetup — there’s no need to wait until your group is big enough to support a large multi-day event, and small events are a lot of fun because everyone has a chance to be involved and get to know most of the other attendees.

 

Contributor Weekend: Support Forums

Our first global contributor drive is coming up next weekend, January 30-31, 2016, and we want you to be involved!

Many of our current contributors first got involved at a Contributor Day at a WordCamp or WordPress Meetup event near them, but not everyone has had that opportunity, so we’re trying to create an online experience that will give new contributors the same kind of live support and group dynamic. We’ll be doing these as weekend challenges rather than one-day events so that WordPress users all over the world can participate without worrying about pesky time zones, but each challenge will be designed to be completed within a few hours, comparable to an in-person Contributor Day.

Our inaugural Contributor Weekend is focused on the Support Team — the folks who volunteer their time to help people with WordPress questions in the support forums and IRC. Over the two day span, forum moderators will be available online to help new contributors and answer questions as needed. The challenge this month is called 20 Questions; your mission (should you choose to accept it) is to help WordPress users by answering 20 forum support requests over the course of the weekend.

You can participate on your own, or you can get together with other people from your local meetup group and work on it together. Working together in person is really fun, so we highly recommend trying to get some folks together if you’re able, but if that’s not possible you can still connect to other participants online. Either way, this is a great way to give back to the WordPress project and have some fun helping people at the same time.

Interested? Get the details on how to participate.

Hope to see you next weekend!