Today’s roundup focuses on WordPress 5.0 and its upcoming release date, but we’ll also discuss some interesting and new Gutenberg related news. And, I did my best to introduce a couple of interesting bits throughout this roundup. Every single link is certainly worth checking out! Let’s dive in, shall we?

When will WordPress 5.0 be released?

The question I heard most in the last couple of weeks was this: When will WordPress 5.0 be released? And that is a great question! Unfortunately, not one we have a straight answer to at the moment. The first Release Candidate (RC) was released last week and we’re expecting RC 2 today. But, that still doesn’t point to a specific date. The best answer we currently have is that the date will be communicated. Basically, this means the Core team is working hard to fix the outstanding issues but is not quite ready to commit to a specific date.

My take is that they don’t want to send out a message with a specific date again if they’re not 100% sure they can commit to it. Matt Mullenweg certainly isn’t excluding a December release in his Gutenberg FAQ:

Is it terrible to do a release in December?
Some people think so, some don’t. There have been 9 major WordPress releases in previous Decembers. December releases actually comprise 34% of our major releases in the past decade.

So, let’s just wait and see what happens in the next week.

Gutenberg related news

A few Gutenberg related things have happened in the last couple of weeks that I think could be of interest for you to know. Matt Mullenweg’s post about Gutenberg FAQs is one of them, but there are more.

Block Lab

In a previous roundup, I talked about how ACF would be used to generate blocks for Gutenberg. But they aren’t the only ones trying to figure out how to improve this flow. Block Lab is trying to do exactly this as well. It introduces an interface in the WordPress Admin and a simple templating system for building custom Gutenberg blocks. Definitely worth checking out if you’ve been looking for easier ways to implement custom blocks.

Jetpack 6.8 introduces blocks for Gutenberg

Jetpack 6.8 was released this week and with it shipped a couple of blocks for the new WordPress editor. You can read all about it in WP Tavern’s post about Jetpack 6.8 or read the full release post for Jetpack 6.8 on Jetpack’s blog.

Food for thought

Smashing Magazine published an interesting article, by Leonardo Losoviz, about the implications of thinking in blocks instead of blobs. One thing Leonardo says particularly rings true for me:

I believe that switching from blobs of HTML code to components for building sites is nothing short of a paradigm shift. Gutenberg’s impact is much more than a switch from PHP to JavaScript: there are things that could be done in the past which will possibly not make sense anymore.

A paradigm shift is indeed what we’re looking at here. I’m enthusiastic about the things this new WordPress editor allows us to do that were previously very hard to do.

At Yoast, we’re also very excited about the possibilities the new editor introduces and we’ve already got some great ideas lined up. Not only will it allow our content analysis per post to be much more granular, but we also see a great opportunity to improve lots of different kinds of rich data. Our current How-To and FAQ blocks, introduced in Yoast SEO 8.2,  being the first examples of this.

Interesting site speed project

Delivering a speedy website has to be a number one priority for you. We’ve talked about how to use a page speed test to optimize your WordPress website before. Site speed is a topic that will become increasingly important as we move forward. This week, I came across an interesting project along the lines of our post about improving site speed that got me very excited.

Lighthouse is an open-source, automated tool for improving the quality of web pages that is part of the Chrome browser. You give Lighthouse a URL to evaluate, and it runs a series of audits on the page for performance, accessibility, progressive web app capabilities, and more. It then generates a report on how well the page did.

Imagine bringing those audits fully into the context of WordPress powered sites. Wouldn’t that be amazing? Well, we may very well be heading that way. An interesting project aiming to do exactly this is to be kicked off at WordCamp US next week (will we see you there?). Imagine the impact of such a tool! Wouldn’t that be awesome?

Read on: What is Gutenberg? »

 

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This week’s roundup focuses on what’s new in Gutenberg, WordPress 5.0, (of course!) but we also discuss WooCommerce’s upgrade instructions and we have a cool bonus for you! Let’s get to it!

It’s been a bit of a slow week when it comes to news in general. Well, that is, if we ignore the usual suspects: Gutenberg & WordPress 5.0 😉.

Last week’s big announcement was that WordPress 5.0 would be postponed to the 27th of November. This pushes the release date back until after the most intense e-commerce weekend online: Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

Postponing the release for roughly two weeks addresses only some of the arguments out there, but it’s good to see the Core team is listening to outside input.

The last Gutenberg beta

Gutenberg had its last beta release with the release of Gutenberg 4.4, yesterday. Next up are the Release Candidates. The most important updates in 4.4 are:

Some long-standing usability issues were improved around image uploads, permalinks, columns, video backgrounds, etc. It’s now also possible for plugins to remove core panels from the Document sidebar.

Per usual, you can read the rest in the release post over at Make WordPress Core: there are quite a lot of improvement and bug fixes. Furthermore, this release saw a decent amount of refinements with regards to Accessibility and Performance. Two topics we at Yoast hold very dear to our heart.

WordPress 5.0 beta 5

You could easily be fooled thinking the upcoming WordPress 5.0 release is all about integrating the Gutenberg editor, but there’s more!

PHP 7.3 compatibility

WordPress 5.0 also introduces full compatibility with PHP 7.3. The last known PHP 7.3 compatibility issue has been fixed with the release of WordPress 5.0 beta 5. If you’re curious to find out what you should know about PHP 7.3 and WordPress, check out the developer note on the Make WordPress Core blog.

Twenty Nineteen

I’ve mentioned before that WordPress 5.0 will ship with a new default WordPress theme. This beta release saw a lot of small but important improvements for Twenty Nineteen.

WooCommerce & WordPress 5.0

Usually, when there’s an update to any WordPress plugin, it can be processed fairly smoothly. However, in some cases, you should test updates in a staging environment first, before you do this on the live site. And in some cases, you should test in a staging environment and follow a specific sequence of steps.

With the upcoming WordPress 5.0 release and WooCommerce, this is the case. The tl;dr is that, before you update to WordPress 5.0, you first need to update WooCommerce to the 3.5.1 version. If you’re running WooCommerce, as we do, make sure you read their announcement first.

Bonus

If you have many different types of content on your site, you’ll know it can get a little bit confusing at times. This week, I saw an interesting new product trying to tackle exactly that problem. OrganizeWP aims to provide a new and improved way for editors to manage their content. Learn more about their features here.

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It’s been a busy week! With the focus fully on getting WordPress 5.0 ready, we’ve seen a lot of news around the Gutenberg integration in the past few days. So let’s dive right in!

Release date concerns

There’s isn’t much time left until the planned release of WordPress 5.0. With the WordPress 5.0 beta 3 still not being stable enough with the inclusion of Gutenberg, there has been a lot of concern about the release date.

Of most note, our CEO, Joost de Valk raised some hefty concerns in a personal blog post where he calls for WordPress 5.0 needing a different timeline. Now, this may seem odd to you given the fact that we as a company have invested so heavily into Gutenberg this past year. Ten people, including the only real accessibility developer for most of the time, to be exact. However, Joost raises two really good reasons for not sticking to the current timeline:

For the full reasoning, do check out his post in full.

Similar concerns are voiced by, for instance, Mark Root-Wiley where he states WordPress 5.0 isn’t ready. Additionally, there are folks like Ned Zimmerman over at Pressbooks, for instance, that don’t see enough parity in Gutenberg features for them to integrate into yet.

Matt Mullenweg, the WordPress 5.0 release lead said after yesterday’s Core chat:

I am luke-warm on the 19th, but not because of the number of open issues (which isn’t a good measure or target) — more that we’ve been a day or two behind a few times now.

Matt Mullenweg

There is another reason why releasing WordPress 5.0 next Friday is not favorable and that’s Black Friday. There have been many voices arguing that releasing such an impactful WordPress upgrade right before, arguably, the busiest weekend for is bringing too much risk. Especially e-commerce sites.

WordPress 5.0 is postponed!

So, ultimately all the issues outlined above have made the Core team make the decision to postpone the 5.0 release. The new release date is set at the 27th of November. Matias Venture says the following:

After listening to a lot of feedback — as well as looking at current issues, ongoing pull requests, and general progress — we’re going to take an extra week to make sure everything is fully dialed in and the release date is now targeted for November 27th.

More information can be found on the Make WordPress Core blog.

WordPress 5.0 beta 3 has been released

WordPress 5.0 Beta 3 has been officially released, and it includes an updated version of the Twenty Nineteen theme. Of course, it also includes the latest version of Gutenberg, 4.2. The previous default themes were updated as well.

Building sites with Gutenberg

Yes, there may be reasons to postpone WordPress 5.0, but that doesn’t mean you can’t already build great things with Gutenberg. Bill Erickson published an interesting post yesterday. In it, he explains how he’s already built sites integrating with Gutenberg. From simple to more complex sites, Bill has some solid advice for those of you building websites.

What if you’re not ready for Gutenberg?

So, you don’t think your site(s) are ready for Gutenberg yet yourself? Well, then it’s good to know that the WordPress Core team has committed itself to officially supporting The Classic Editor plugin until the 31st of December, 2021. You can read more about that in Gary Pendergast post over at Make WordPress Core.

JavaScript Language packs have landed in WordPress

Fresh off the press: JavaScript Language packs have finally been merged into WordPress. Our CTO, Omar Reiss explains on the Make WordPress Core blog:

We can now translate strings in JavaScript files and distribute them via https://translate.wordpress.org. This functionality will soon be expanded to also work for plugins and themes. This is a major milestone for JavaScript development in WordPress and completes the JavaScript package inclusion focus.

– Omar Reiss

One more step into making sure WordPress is as inclusive as possible when it comes to translations. And a great one at that!

Bonus

If using one of the available WordPress hosting companies isn’t hardcore enough for you, then maybe SpinupWP is! It’s a new service released by Delicious Brains Inc. and it looks like a very neat solution for self-managed WordPress servers.

The post WordPress 5.0 is postponed, Gutenberg site building tips and more! appeared first on Yoast.

This week, we talk about the updates in the Genesis Framework. Also, learn what StudioPress is planning to do with it. Of course, we have some Gutenberg and WordPress 5.0 news as well. Let’s dive in!

Genesis Framework receiving love again

One of the oldest WordPress theme frameworks out there is the Genesis Framework by StudioPress. In fact, it’s been around for almost 9 years now! A couple of months ago, WP Engine acquired StudioPress and with that, the Genesis Framework started receiving much-needed attention again.

This week, the 2.7 beta was released which prepares it for the future, for the most part. Additionally, they announced that the framework will get an overhaul from an SEO point of view. Something we applaud, of course.

In related news, Array Themes is now part of StudioPress as well. Or WP Engine, depending on how you look at it. This is great news for StudioPress’s portfolio with both Mike McAllister (the owner of Array Themes) and the themes themselves.

And, as I understand it, most of the Array themes will be ported over to a Genesis Child theme as well. You can read more about that in Mike’s announcement post. As an early adopter of, and contributor to the Genesis Framework, I’m very excited to see where this is going.

A large portion of improving Genesis will go into integrating it with the Gutenberg editor. Both internally in Genesis as well as with the Atomic Blocks plugin that came over from Array Themes to StudioPress.

Gutenberg updates

My roundup wouldn’t be complete – as we’re ramping up to the release of WordPress 5.0 – without mentioning Gutenberg’s latest updates. One of my favorite improvements is this one:

The inserter between blocks has been tweaked so that the experience is consistent with all “add block” buttons — it opens the full inserter now.

For a full overview, read the release post here.

WordPress 5.0 schedule

Just as Gutenberg is being updated and refined, so is WordPress 5.0. Here you’ll find the release schedule for WordPress 5.0. The release is still being slated for November 19. Which is in 17 days!

The post Remkus’ Roundup: Genesis, Gutenberg, WordPress 5.0 appeared first on Yoast.

As we’re getting closer to the release of WordPress 5.0, the amount of WordPress 5.0 related news is increasing. Today, we have news for you on the new Default WordPress Theme, the Gutenberg integration of Advanced Custom Fields and GlotPress. Welcome to the third edition of my roundup!

New Default WordPress Theme is here:

Since the release of WordPress 3.0 – hello 2010! – WordPress shipped with a new default theme. We started with Twenty Ten as we’re approaching 2019, WordPress is getting ready to ship the next default theme with WordPress 5.0.

Twenty Nineteen will be a theme that focuses on writing great content for both bloggers and small businesses. And, as you may have been suspecting already, Twenty Nineteen will fully support the new Gutenberg editor. If you’re already curious to see what Twenty Nineteen will look like, do check out the introduction post.

ACF Gutenberg integration

If you’ve been building content-rich WordPress websites, there’s a good chance you’ve been doing this by using the Advanced Custom Fields plugin, or ACF for short. It allows you to easily add all kinds of metaboxes for all types of content. Given the fact that the Gutenberg editing experience changes the way metaboxes look and work, the team behind ACF decided to find a way to integrate ACF with the Gutenberg blocks. And they’ve succeeded.

Our friends at Delicious Brains have written a great post on how ACF lets you create easily create beautiful rich content Gutenberg blocks. I highly encourage you to check it out. It does get a little technical, but ACF’s solution is by far the easiest way to create Gutenberg blocks right now.

By the way, if you are using ACF, have you seen our ACF Content Analysis for Yoast SEO plugin?

WordPress 5.0 Beta 1 has been released

Slightly behind schedule, WordPress 5.0 Beta 1 has been released. From the release post:

There are two ways to test the WordPress 5.0 beta 1: try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”), or you can download the beta here (zip).

It’s important to mention that this software is still in development. So we don’t recommend you run it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site to play with the new version. And if you are using an existing test site be sure to update the Gutenberg plugin to v4.1.1.

If you’re curious about the planning for the release of WordPress 5.0, do check out the granular timeline that’s available.

GlotPress 3.0

There’s a good chance, if English isn’t your first language, that you’re using an internationalized version of WordPress. In other words, WordPress is fully translated in your language. The software that powers the translation of WordPress, but also themes, plugins and more, is called GlotPress.

Greg Ross, who recently took over the lead-developer role from Dominik Schilling, has announced what needs to happen for the next big version of GlotPress. My favorite new feature is for GlotPress to support locale versions. What’s yours?

 

The post Remkus’ Roundup: Twenty Nineteen, GlotPress & ACF Gutenberg integration appeared first on Yoast.

It’s time for my weekly roundup again. This week of WordPress news has been an interesting one. So, let’s dive right in.

The focus of last week was mostly on the release date WordPress 5.0 with the inclusion of Gutenberg as a primary goal. As you can imagine, there was a lot of discussion on the various blogs about the suggested release dates. As soon as there’s something new to be mentioned about those release dates, we’ll let you know here. But for now, let’s dive right in!

WordCamp Nordic

An interesting new WordCamp was announced this week by lead organizer Marco Martins: WordCamp Nordic. As you can probably gather by its name, it focuses on the Nordic, or Scandinavian, countries in Europe. The first edition will take place in Helsinki, Finland and will include a Contributor Day and a Community Day additional to the event day itself. And yes, there will be saunas. How can you not when you’re in Finland, right?

If you’d like to know more about it, you can read WP Tavern’s interview with the organizers or head straight to the site of WordCamp Nordic.

I’m glad WordCamp Nordic is finally happening after two years of talking about it. I’m also excited to see other kinds of regional WordCamps happening outside of WordCamp Europe and WordCamp US.

WooSesh

WooSesh, an online conference about WooCommerce will host its first edition on October 18 and 19. If you build WooCommerce stores in any way, this all-new virtual conference for WooCommerce is for you. They have a very interesting line up of speakers and to top it all off, attendance is for free. Check out their website for more information.

Core Privacy Component Roadmap

Heather Burns, who led the introduction of the privacy component in WordPress 4.9.6 has suggested a roadmap. If you’d like to stay updated and/or help out, now would be a great time to get involved.

Gutenberg Release Candidate 1

The last versions of a software before go live are called Release Candidates. The Gutenberg project has released the first Release Candidate this week. If you’d like to know more about what exactly is in Gutenberg RC1, Mattias Ventura explains all in his introduction post. By the way, if you’re curious what’s planned for Gutenberg after it’s been included in WordPress Core, phase 2 and its focus was announced as well last week.

SiteGround WordPress Ambassadors

One of our WordPress hosting partners, SiteGround, announced they’ve started sponsoring, what they’re calling, SiteGround WordPress Ambassadors. So, much like our Yoast Diversity Fund, they’re helping out people being able to speak at WordCamps who otherwise might not be able to. I think this is a great example of contributing back to the WordPress Project and I’d love to see more companies in the WordPress ecosphere doing things like this.

That’s it for me for this week. Enjoy your weekend!

The post Remkus’ Roundup: New conferences, Gutenberg news and more! appeared first on Yoast.

Welcome to the first of my weekly Remkus’ Roundup post. This is the beginning of a series where I’ll share what’s happening in the WordPress community. Let’s start with this week!

The road to WordPress 5.0

The most important news of this week revolves around two blog posts over at the Make WordPress Core blog. The first one is from Matt Mullenweg in which he explains his plan for WordPress 5.0.

In case you’ve missed it, WordPress 5.0 is considered a major release with the inclusion of a completely new editor experience named Gutenberg. We’re very excited about the possibilities that Gutenberg adds to WordPress. So much so, that if you’ve activated the Gutenberg plugin on your site, we’ve added two blocks to the editor already.

Matt Mullenweg explains in his post what the road towards 5.0 is going to look like. He also explains how the Core team is going to make sure all angles are covered via various focused teams. One of those teams, the JavaScript Packages team, will be led by our CTO: Omar Reiss. Omar will focus on integrating JavaScript packages on NPM.

Following Mullenweg’s post, the second post I’d like to highlight is Gary Pendergast’s post on the same blog. It’s about the Proposed WordPress 5.0 scope and schedule. In it, he outlines a proposed schedule that looks like this:

  • Beta 1: October 19, 2018
  • RC 1: October 30, 2018
  • Release: November 19, 2018

Meaning, that if all goes well, WordPress 5.0 will be available before the end the year. I myself, couldn’t be more excited about this!

Bonus blog post: Gary Pendergast’s call to action post on his own blog about to get involved with the integration of Gutenberg into WordPress 5.0 is worth a read as well.

WordCamp Europe tickets

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The next edition of WordCamp Europe will take place in Berlin next year. WordCamp Europe holds a special place in my heart, as I’m one of the co-founders. For that reason, I’m pretty excited about what the seventh edition will look like. If you’ve never been there, I highly recommend you take a look at what we did for this year’s edition. Without a doubt, we’ll do our best to make next year’s edition even better!

Tickets are being released in batches, so get them while they’re hot :) . See you in Berlin?

Read more: What is Gutenberg »

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