Here in the U.S. we are observing Independence Day, and I can’t think of a more fitting way to mark a day that celebrates freedom than by releasing more free software to help democratize publishing around the globe. I’m excited to announce that WordPress 3.2 is now available to the world, both as an update in your dashboard and a download on Version 3.2 is our fifteenth major release of WordPress and comes just four months after 3.1 (which coincidentally just passed the 15 million download mark this morning), reflecting the growing speed of development in the WordPress community and our dedication to getting improvements in your hands as soon as possible. We’re dedicating this release to noted composer and pianist George Gershwin.

Before we get to the release, in anticipation of the State of the Word speech at the upcoming WordCamp San Francisco (the annual WordPress conference) we’re doing a survey or census of the WordPress world. If you have a moment, please fill out this survey and we’ll share what we learn by publishing the aggregate results in August.

The focus for this release was making WordPress faster and lighter. The first thing you’ll notice when you log in to 3.2 is a refreshed dashboard design that tightens the typography, design, and code behind the admin. (Rhapsody in Grey?) If you’re starting a new blog, you’ll also appreciate the fully HTML5 new Twenty Eleven theme, fulfilling our plan to replace the default theme every year. Start writing your first post in our redesigned post editor and venture to the full-screen button in the editing toolbar to enter the new distraction-free writing or zen mode, my personal favorite feature of the release. All of the widgets, menus, buttons, and interface elements fade away to allow you to compose and edit your thoughts in a completely clean environment conducive to writing, but when your mouse strays to the top of the screen your most-used shortcuts are right there where you need them. (I like to press F11 to take my browser full-screen, getting rid of even the OS chrome.)

Under the hood there have been a number of improvements, not the least of which is the streamlining enabled by our previously announced plan of retiring support for PHP4, older versions of MySQL, and legacy browsers like IE6, which allows us to take advantage of more features enabled by new technologies. The admin bar has a few more shortcuts to your most commonly-used actions. On the comment moderation screen, the new approve & reply feature speeds up your conversation management. You’ll notice in your first update after 3.2 that we’ll only be updating the files that have changed with each new release instead of every file in your WordPress installation, which makes updates significantly faster on all hosting platforms. There are also some fun new theme features shown off by Twenty Eleven, like the ability to have multiple rotating header images to highlight all of your favorite photos.

There is way more, like our new freedoms and credits screens (linked from your dashboard footer), so for the full story check out the Codex page on 3.2 or the Trac milestone which includes the 400+ tickets closed in this release.

A Community Effort

We now finally have a credits page inside of WordPress itself (though a cool revision is coming in 3.3), but for posterity let’s give a round of applause to these fine folks who contributed to 3.2:

Aaron Brazell, Aaron Campbell, Aaron Jorbin, Adam Harley, Alex Concha, ampt, Andrew Nacin, Andrew Ozz, andrewryno, andy, Austin Matzko, BenChapman, Ben Dunkle, bluntelk, Boone Gorges, Brandon Allen, Brandon Burke, Caspie, cfinke, charlesclarkson, chexee, coffee2code, Cristi Burcă, daniloercoli, Daryl Koopersmith, David Cowgill, David Trower, demetris, Devin Reams, Dion Hulse, dllh, Dominik Schilling, Doug Provencio, dvwallin, Dylan Kuhn, Eric Mann, fabifott, Franklin Tse, Frumph, garyc40, Glenn Ansley, guyn, hakre, hebbet, Helen Hou-Sandi, hew, holizz, Ian Stewart, Jacob Gillespie, Jane Wells, Jayjdk, Jeff Farthing, Joachim Kudish, joelhardi, John Blackbourn, John Ford, John James Jacoby, JohnONolan, Jon Cave, joostdevalk, Jorge Bernal, Joseph Scott, Justin Sternberg, Justin Tadlock, kevinB, Knut Sparhell, kovshenin, Kuraishi, Lance Willett, linuxologos, lloydbudd, Luc De Brouwer, marcis20, Mark Jaquith, Mark McWilliams, Martin Lormes, Matías Ventura, Matt Martz, Matt Thomas, MattyRob, mcepl, mdawaffe, Michael Fields, MichaelH, michaeltyson, Mike Schroder, Milan Dinić, mintindeed, mitchoyoshitaka, Mohammad Jangda, mrroundhill, natecook, nathanrice, Niall Kennedy, Nick Bohle, Nikolay Bachiyski, nuxwin, Otto, pavelevap, pete.mall, Peter Westwood, Prasath Nadarajah, Ptah Dunbar, Rafael Poveda, Rahe, Ramiy, Rasheed Bydousi, Reuben Gunday, Robert Chapin, Ron Rennick, Ross Hanney, Ryan Boren, Ryan Imel, Safirul Alredha, Samir Shah, saracannon, sbressler, Sergey Biryukov, shakenstirred, Sidney Harrell, Simon Prosser, sorich87, szadok, tetele, tigertech, trepmal, Utkarsh Kukreti, valentinas, webduo, Xavier Borderie, Yoav Farhi, Ze Fontainhas, and ziofix.

Bonus: On their profiles over 20,000 people have said they make their living from WordPress. Are you one of them? Don’t forget to take a minute for our survey.

WordPress 3.2 is going to be released very soon, and we want you to be ready! Take note: the minimum requirements are changing.


As of 3.2, you’ll need to be running PHP 5.2.4 and MySQL 5.0. As we mentioned almost a year ago when we announced that this change was coming, the percentage of people running older versions of PHP and MySQL is relatively low. With more than 45 million people using WordPress, though, even a small percentage can mean a lot of people! Don’t caught with your pants dashboard down — make sure you’re running compatible versions of PHP and MySQL before you update tomorrow when WordPress 3.2 is released.

Log in to your hosting account, and check to make sure you have at least  PHP 5.2.4 and MySQL 5.0. Most of the major hosts already default to these or newer versions, but there are some exceptions. Check to see which versions you are running, and if you’re still on an older version, it should be as simple as changing a dropdown menu and clicking Save to get up to date.

If you don’t know how to find this information in your hosting account or you don’t even know how to access your hosting control panel because someone else manages that for you, don’t fret. You can find out if you’re ready for 3.2 with the Health Check plugin. In your dashboard, go to Plugins → Add New and search for “health check” (it should be the first result). Install it, activate it, and it will tell you if you need to update anything.

If you need more help, contact your host’s customer service and use this email template to ask them to help you.

Hi there. I host my domain [] with you, and I run WordPress on my site. The minimum requirements are changing to PHP 5.2.4 and MySQL 5.0, and I would appreciate your help in confirming that my site’s setup meets these requirements. If I’m currently running an older version of PHP or MySQL, could you update it for me, or tell me how to do it? Thanks so much!

If your host replies that they can’t update to these versions, it might be time to look for a new host.

IE6 and Outdated Browsers

With 3.2, we’re also dropping support for Internet Explorer 6, a 10-years-old outdated browser that even Microsoft is ready to leave behind. From now on, if you access your WordPress dashboard from an outdated browser, we’ll let you know. Why? Because as web technology improves, so does WordPress, as we build features to take advantage of these improvements. If you’re using an out-of-date browser, chances are you’re missing out.

If your browser is out of date, you’ll see a friendly orangey-yellow box in your dashboard letting you know you a newer version is available (which you can dismiss, of course). If you’re using IE6, though, the box will be red, and your dashboard will not function properly. If you’re stuck on IE6 because the computer you use is maintained by a business, library, school, or the like, and you are not able to download a newer browser, here’s a sample email you can use to ask your boss/administrator/IT guys to update the browser.

Hi there. The computer I use at [where you use the computer] is equipped with an out-of-date web browser. Internet Explorer 6 was created 10 years ago, before modern web standards, and does not support modern web applications. More and more sites and applications are dropping support for IE6, including the new version of WordPress. Even Microsoft, the makers of IE6, are counting down until IE6 goes the way of the dinosaur (see for more information). Can you please install an updated version of IE or any modern browser (see for more information) on the available computers? Thank you very much.

Welcome to the future!



Hiring someone new is always a high-impact activity in terms of business. And there are many ways of finding valuable employees. Posting job descriptions on Craigslist is one idea. Relying on word of mouth and recommendations is another. But the online world these days offers a lot more solutions. Hence the list of 16 top websites where you can hire someone without losing your shirt. Check out my guest post at

Top 16 Places Where You Can Hire Someone Without Losing Your Shirt

Now I have a bonus for you. A place where you can go to find a business partner.

Build It With Me

This site is a little different. It’s not exactly meant to be a place where you can simply hire someone. But rather a place where you can find a partner who can help you with developing your tool, app, or any other software. When you visit the site you’ll see that there are already tens of people looking for developers or designers to help them to put their app-ideas to life. You can easily join this community and post your own entry. The site doesn’t cover any legal aspects of possible partnerships, it’s just a discovery tool.

Related Posts:

Progress on the new SFC continues. Added a new plugin to it this morning: Photos. It’s a simple little plugin, and not pretty yet, but it does work. :)

Here’s a couple of example screenshots:

Facebook Images

The selection screen (not pretty, but functional)

Example of the result

Example of the result

The plugin itself turns out actually to be quite simple. It turns out that adding to the media tabs is fairly straightforward with the existing WordPress functionality, and making links that insert things into the post code is not nearly as difficult as I thought it might be.

You can use the SFC beta version if you like. There’s a copy in the WordPress SVN directories. However, it’s buggy and unfinished and doesn’t have all the same functionality. But most of it works okay. Still needs polish before releasing it.

Note that all development on the old SFC 0.25 has ceased. I’m not making any further patches to it. If you want to upgrade now to the 0.999 beta version, feel free. Also, patches welcome.

WordPress 3.1.4 is available now and is a maintenance and security update for all previous versions.

This release fixes an issue that could allow a malicious Editor-level user to gain further access to the site. Thanks K. Gudinavicius of SEC Consult for bringing this to our attention. Version 3.1.4 also incorporates several other security fixes and hardening measures thanks to the work of WordPress developers Alexander Concha and Jon Cave of our security team. Consult the change log for more details.

Download WordPress 3.1.4 or update immediately from the Dashboard → Updates menu in your site’s admin area.

WordPress 3.2 Release Candidate 3

This release was about all that stood in the way of a final release of WordPress 3.2. So we’re also announcing the third release candidate for 3.2, which contains all of the fixes in 3.1.4; few minor RTL, JavaScript, and user interface fixes; and ensures graceful failures if 3.2 is run on PHP4. As a reminder, we’ve bumped our minimum requirements for version 3.2 to PHP 5.2.4 and MySQL 5.0.

To test WordPress 3.2, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the release candidate here (zip). At this stage, plugin authors should be doing final tests to ensure compatibility.

Bonus: For more on what to test and what to do if you find an issue, please read our Beta 1 post.

The Parrot PlaceThe Parrot place is an online pet shop, offering pet supplies, fish food, and specialising in supplies for birds.

It is WordPress-driven, and uses the E-commerce plugin for online sales.

Urban Legend web was contracted to create the collapsible menus on the left side of the site, and to make changes to the backend of the E-commerce plugin to clarify the display of categories. We also helped with some minor styling tweaks to the main menus.

Marblehead GalleryMarble Head Galley is a restaurant in Marblehead, Ohio, USA.

Urban Legend web was contracted to provide a calendar application which let the site owners enter daily dinner specials by month. We used an existing WordPress plugin, calendar, and incorporated it into the slider mechanism used on the front page of the site.

We customised the calendar plugin so that the current week’s specials only were shown, with a link to the full calendar month.  We helped to style the calendar, but weren’t involved in the design of the site itself.

Howdy! The second release candidate for WordPress 3.2 is now available. If you haven’t tested WordPress 3.2 yet, now is the time — please though, not on your live site unless you’re extra adventurous.

We’ve handled a number of issues since RC1, including additional Twenty Eleven tweaks, a new theme support option for defaulting to randomized headers, and various RTL fixes.

Plugin and theme authors, please test your plugins and themes now, so that if there is a compatibility issue, we can figure it out before the final release. Users are also encouraged to test things out. If you find problems, let your plugin/theme authors know so they can figure out the cause. If you are testing the release candidate and think you’ve found a bug, there are a few ways to let us know:

To test WordPress 3.2, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the release candidate here (zip).

If any known issues crop up, you’ll be able to find them here. If you’d like to know which levers to pull in your testing, check out a list of features in our Beta 1 post.

scoreboardIs there a way to calculate productivity? If so, then I’m the perfect person to tell you about it (not to toot my own horn here, of course). You see, it’s late night here in Poland and yet I’m still sitting here, writing this short post, and feeling productive.

To calculate productivity, using my method, you have to follow a simple 6-step productivity scoreboard.

But first, let’s set one thing straight. Before you can start tracking your points you need to learn the difference between being productive and being busy. As there are no points for being busy.

Being productive is a goal-oriented activity. It’s when you’re doing something that brings you closer to your goals, closer to what you want to achieve. It’s doing the high-leverage activities only.

Being busy is a labor-oriented activity. It’s when you’re doing something just for the sake of doing something. It’s doing the low-leverage activities and not being aware that they will probably get you nowhere.

So stay productive, not busy!

Now, the 6-step productivity scoreboard:

First of all, there’s no maximum amount of points you can get each day. This means there are no limitations and that you can be breaking your personal records every day.

Step #1 – setting deadlines

Take a list of all the tasks you want to do and set a deadline for each one of them.

Also, set a reward for completing each task. Something small. Like eating a donut, or having a drink, or whatever.

No points yet, just bear with me.

Step #2 – focusing for 5 minutes

It’s impossible to stay in the “work” state of mind for a longer period of time. We all have our up- and down-times. Whenever a down-time happens just acknowledge it, be aware of it, and immediately after try to return to work by promising yourself that you’re just going to focus for 5 minutes.

Chances are that if you can focus for 5 minutes you will end up focusing for a significantly longer period of time.

Every time you can force yourself to focus for 5 minutes after a down-time +1 point for you.

Step #3 – satisfaction

Feeling some satisfaction after you’ve finished a piece of work is nothing unusual. But feeling it immediately after starting the work is another story.

Try to feel satisfaction right from the get-go, during the first minute of your work routine.

Every time you do that +1 point for you.

Step #4 – no multitasking!

Multitasking is more harmful to your brain than smoking weed (proven fact). So don’t do it no matter what!

You get +1 point for each hour you’re not multitasking. You get -2 for each hour you are.

Step #5 – quick decision making

Whenever you stop and hesitate because you’re not comfortable with making a decision you’re losing time and breaking your productive mindset.

So if you feel that you won’t get any additional data that can help you with the decision then just go ahead and make it immediately.

Every time you do that +1 point for you.

Step #6 – reviewing your work

Go back to the deadlines you’ve set in step #1. Did you manage to get the work done in time?

You get +1 point for every task done on time.

That’s it. I encourage you to calculate productivity, your own productivity, that is. Treat it as a cool quiz, something that’s perfect for a slow Friday at work.

Here’s a list of articles you may also enjoy:

Related Posts:

Earlier today the WordPress team noticed suspicious commits to several popular plugins (AddThis, WPtouch, and W3 Total Cache) containing cleverly disguised backdoors. We determined the commits were not from the authors, rolled them back, pushed updates to the plugins, and shut down access to the plugin repository while we looked for anything else unsavory.

We’re still investigating what happened, but as a prophylactic measure we’ve decided to force-reset all passwords on To use the forums, trac, or commit to a plugin or theme, you’ll need to reset your password to a new one. (Same for and

As a user, make sure to never use the same password for two different services, and we encourage you not to reset your password to be the same as your old one.

Second, if you use AddThis, WPtouch, or W3 Total Cache and there’s a possibility you could have updated in the past day, make sure to visit your updates page and upgrade each to the latest version.