The WordPress Polyglots team is organizing the second Global WordPress Translation Day on November 12th. Everyone is invited to join – from anywhere in the world!

Translating is one of the easiest ways to get involved with WordPress and contribute to the project. Global WordPress Translation Day is your chance to learn more about translating WordPress, meet people from all over the world, and translate WordPress into one of more than 160 languages.

Join us on November 12th from anywhere in the world

The translation day starts on Saturday, November 12th, 2016, at 0:00 UTC and ends 24 hours later. See what time that is for you! You can join right from the start, or any time it’s convenient for you throughout the day.

What are we doing?

Local contributor days are happening all over the world, and are a great way to get involved. Check out this map to see if there’s already a local event happening near you. Can’t find one? Organize a local event!

At the same time, join the community for 24 hours of live-streamed, remote sessions in numerous languages. Sessions will cover localization, internationalization, and contributing in your language.

Who’s it for?

Whether you’re new to translating and want to learn how to translate, or an experienced translation editor building a strong team, the translation day is for you. Developers will also enjoy topics from experienced contributors, whether you’re learning about internationalization and or want to find more translators for your themes and plugins. There’s a session for everyone!

Get Involved

Joining is easy! On November 12th, in your own timezone, translate WordPress or your favorite plugins and themes into your language, while watching live sessions over the course of the day.

Want to get more involved? Sign up to organize a local event and invite your local community to translate together on November 12th. Events can be formal or completely informal – grab your laptop and a couple of friends, and head to a local coffee shop to translate for an hour or two.

Can you get involved if you only speak English?

Absolutely! Even if you only speak English, there are great sessions about internationalization that can benefit every developer. There’s also lots of English variants that need your help! For example, English is spoken and written differently in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa, and the United Kingdom. You can learn about these differences and why these variants are important during the sessions.

And if you’re feeling fun, try translating WordPress into emoji! Yep, we have a translation of WordPress in emoji! 🌎🌍🌏

Questions?

If you have any questions, the polyglots team and the event organizers hang out in #polyglots in Slack and are happy to help! (Get an invite to Slack at chat.wordpress.org.)

Sign up to take part in the event on the official website.

Global WordPress Translation Day is a one-day contributor initiative organised by the WordPress project’s Polyglots team that is dedicated to helping new contributors who would like to translate WordPress in one of the 160 languages WordPress is available in.

Global WordPress Translation Day will be on Sunday, April 24th, starting at 0:00 UTC and will go on for 24 hours covering all time zones.

What are we doing?

  • Live training: A 24h live streaming of tutorials about translating WordPress in different languages and making your code translatable (30min/1h sessions in different languages including a general instruction and specifics for that particular language). The internationalization sessions will be in English. The sessions will be presented by some of the most experienced WordPress translators and internationalization experts. The Schedule can be found on the website.
  • Local translation contributor days: Groups of contributors gather at different locations and work face to face.
  • Local remote translation contributor days: Current translation teams dedicate time and get involved remotely to do orientation for their potential contributors or work with their current translation teams on translating as many strings as they can.

If you organise a local meetup, why not organise a contributor day for translating in your language?

Join us! Read about the initiative and sign up as an organiser.

Can I get involved if I only speak English?

Yes! Even if you only speak English, it would be great to get involved and check out some of the English locale variants – English as spoken in the United Kingdom, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, South Africa. English has many variants across the globe and you can learn about the differences and why it’s important that users have the option to choose a variant during some of our sessions. And if you’re in a funky mood, you can give translating the interface into Emoji a try! Yes, we have a WordPress in Emoji locale!

Questions?

The polyglots team and the event organisers hang out in #Polyglots in Slack. They will gladly help you out.

It’s time for our second global contributor weekend, and this time we’re focusing on the video team. For this month’s challenge, in honor of it being our second month, you have two options for how you can participate! The challenge for this month overall is to work with at least one hour worth of WordCamp video, which you can do by either creating subtitles or editing the video file in preparation for upload to WordPress.tv.

One of the great things about contributing to the video team is that you get to learn so much, since all the work basically involves watching WordCamp presentation videos. Subtitling is a doubly important need, as it is needed to make all those WordCamp videos accessible to people who are deaf or hard of hearing and can’t listen to the audio track, as well as making it possible for the videos to be consumed (in some cases after subtitle translation) by people who speak different languages.

The challenge will last from Saturday, February 27, 2016 through Sunday, February 28, 2016, and the results will be reviewed afterward by members of the video team. If you enjoy the challenge, the video team would be very excited to welcome you into their ranks! Interested? Here’s how to participate.

What About Last Month?

In January, the inaugural contributor weekend was focused on the support forums. That challenge had 73 participants, including 10 people who provided 20 or more correct answers to open support threads, thereby winning the challenge. Congratulations to Harris Anastasiadis, Ahmad Awais, Takis Bouyouris, Phil Erb, Eric Gunawan, Jackie McBride, Diana Nichols, Kostas Nicolacopoulos, Juhi Saxena, and Sarah Semark! To them and to everyone else who participated, thank you so much for your efforts. Every answer helps, and over the course of this contributor weekend, these amazing volunteers responded to 800 support threads. The support forums queue of requests with no replies went from 28 pages to 7 pages — that was an incredible success, of which every participant was a part!

So head on over to see how to get involved with the one-hour video challenge this weekend, and help us make next month’s post just as impressive! ?

WordCamps are locally-organized WordPress conferences that happen all over the world (and are so fun). Sometimes people don’t realize that WordCamps are organized by local volunteers rather than a central organization, and they contact us asking, “Can you bring WordCamp to my city?” When this happens, we always suggest they start with a meetup group, and think about organizing a WordCamp themselves after their group has been active for a few months. We emphasize that WordCamps are locally-organized events, not something that the central community team plans from afar.

This has been successful in many areas — there are currently 241 meetup groups on our meetup.com chapter program! In some regions, though, enthusiastic volunteers have had more of a challenge getting things started. Because of this, we’re going to try an experiment this year called the WordCamp Incubator.

The intention of the incubator program is to help spread WordPress to underserved areas through providing more significant organizing support for a first event. In practical terms, this experiment means we’ll be choosing three cities in 2016 where there is not an active WordPress community — but where it seems like there is a lot of potential and where there are some people excited to become organizers — and will help to organize their first WordCamp. These WordCamps will be small, one-day, one-track events geared toward the goal of generating interest and getting people involved in creating an ongoing local community.*

So, where should we do these three events?  If you have always wanted a WordCamp in your city but haven’t been able to get a meetup group going, this is a great opportunity. We will be taking applications for the next week, then will get in touch with everyone who applied to discuss the possibilities. We will announce the  cities chosen by the end of March.

To apply, fill in the application by February 26, 2016. You don’t need to have any specific information handy, it’s just a form to let us know you’re interested. You can apply to nominate your city even if you don’t want to be the main organizer, but for this experiment  we will need local liaisons and volunteers, so please only nominate cities where you live or work so that we have at least one local connection to begin.

Thanks, and good luck!

For the record, that describes the ideal first WordCamp even if you have an active meetup — there’s no need to wait until your group is big enough to support a large multi-day event, and small events are a lot of fun because everyone has a chance to be involved and get to know most of the other attendees.

 

Our first global contributor drive is coming up next weekend, January 30-31, 2016, and we want you to be involved!

Many of our current contributors first got involved at a Contributor Day at a WordCamp or WordPress Meetup event near them, but not everyone has had that opportunity, so we’re trying to create an online experience that will give new contributors the same kind of live support and group dynamic. We’ll be doing these as weekend challenges rather than one-day events so that WordPress users all over the world can participate without worrying about pesky time zones, but each challenge will be designed to be completed within a few hours, comparable to an in-person Contributor Day.

Our inaugural Contributor Weekend is focused on the Support Team — the folks who volunteer their time to help people with WordPress questions in the support forums and IRC. Over the two day span, forum moderators will be available online to help new contributors and answer questions as needed. The challenge this month is called 20 Questions; your mission (should you choose to accept it) is to help WordPress users by answering 20 forum support requests over the course of the weekend.

You can participate on your own, or you can get together with other people from your local meetup group and work on it together. Working together in person is really fun, so we highly recommend trying to get some folks together if you’re able, but if that’s not possible you can still connect to other participants online. Either way, this is a great way to give back to the WordPress project and have some fun helping people at the same time.

Interested? Get the details on how to participate.

Hope to see you next weekend!

Last week saw the halfway point for 2015, yay! This seems like a good time to update you on WordCamp happenings in the first half of this year.

There have been 39 WordCamps in 2015 so far, with events organized in 17 different countries and on 5 continents. More than 14,000 people have registered for WordCamp tickets so far this year, isn’t that amazing?

WordCamp Europe was held in Seville, Spain just a few weeks ago, with close to 1,000 registered participants and over 500 live stream participants. You can watch  Matt Mullenweg’s keynote Q&A session from WordCamp Europe right now on WordPress.tv.

WordPress.tv has published 537 videos so far in 2015 from WordCamps around the world. Some of the more popular 2015 WordCamp talks on WordPress.tv include Tammie Lister: Theme, Don’t Be My Everything from WordCamp Maui, Jenny Munn: SEO for 2015 – What’s In, What’s Out and How to Be In It to Win It (For Good) from WordCamp Atlanta, Fabrice Ducarme: Les Constructeurs de Page pour WordPress from WordCamp Paris, Ben Furfie: How to Value Price Websites from WordCamp London, and Morten Rand-Hendriksen: Building Themes From Scratch Using Underscores (_S) from WordCamp Seattle. Check them out!

Lots of great WordCamps are still to come

WordCamp US is currently in pre-planning, in the process of deciding on a host city. The following cities have proposed themselves as a great place to host the first WordCamp US: Chattanooga, Chicago, Detroit, Orlando, Philadelphia, and Phoenix. It’s possible the first WordCamp US will be held in 2016 so we can organize the best first WordCamp US imaginable.

At this time, there are 28 WordCamps, in 9 different countries, that have announced their dates for the rest of 2015. Twelve of these have tickets on sale:

The other 16 events don’t have tickets on sale yet, but they’ve set their dates! Subscribe to the sites to find out when registration opens:

On top of all those exciting community events, there are 26 WordCamps in pre-planning as they look for the right event space.  If you have a great idea for a free or cheap WordCamp venue in any of the below locations, get in touch with the organizers through the WordCamp sites:

Don’t see your city on the list, but yearning for a local WordCamp? WordCamps are organized by local volunteers from the WordPress community, and we have a whole team of people to support new organizers setting up a first-time WordCamp. If you want to bring WordCamp to town, check out how you can become a WordCamp organizer!

WordCamp San Francisco is the official annual WordPress conference, gathering the community every year since 2006. This is the time when Matt Mullenweg addresses the community in his annual State of the Word presentation – a recap of  the year in WordPress and giving us a glimpse into its future.

This year the speaker lineup is stellar. There will be talks by three of the lead WordPress developers: Andrew Nacin, Helen Hou-Sandí, and Mark Jaquith. We’re also looking forward to speakers like Jenny Lawson, also known as The Bloggess, and Chris Lema. If you’re at all interested in the web, you will appreciate the appearance of Jeff Veen – one of the creators of Google Analytics and co-founder of Typekit.

Even though San Francisco is far far away for most of you, you can still be part of the fun and watch all presentations in real-time via livestream:

Get a livestream ticket and watch all talks from WordCamp San Francisco live

If you hurry, you can get one of the special livestream tickets, including a WordCamp San Francisco 2104 t-shirt. You can find all the technical details and start times at the WordCamp San Francisco website.

WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences that celebrate everything related to WordPress, and are a great opportunity to meet other WordPress users and professionals in your community. This has been a great year for WordCamps — there have been 56 so far in more than 20 countries, and there another 15 on the calendar before the year’s over. If there’s one near you, check it out! In addition to getting to know your local WordPress community, most WordCamps attract some traveling visitors a well, giving you the chance to meet contributors to the WordPress open source project and get involved yourself.

Here are the WordCamps on the schedule for the rest of this year.

October 25-27: WordCamp Boston, Boston, MA, USA
October 25-26: WordCamp Malaga, Spain
October 26: WordCamp Nepal, Kathmandu, Nepal
October 26: WordCamp Sofia, Bulgaria
November 7: WordCamp Cape Town, South Africa
November 9: WordCamp Porto, Portugal
November 9-10: WordCamp Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya
November 15: WordCamp Edmonton, AB, Canada
November 16-17: WordCamp Orlando, FL, USA
November 16: WordCamp Denver, CO, USA
November 23-24: WordCamp London, UK
November 23-24: WordCamp Raleigh, NC, USA
November 23: WordCamp São Paulo, Brazil
December 14: WordCamp Las Vegas, NV, USA
December 14-15: WordCamp Sevilla, Spain

No WordCamps on this list in your area? Not to worry! There are thriving WordPress meetups all over the world where you can meet like-minded people, and we maintain a library of WordCamp videos at WordPress.tv.

Get Involved

  • If you’re interested in organizing a WordCamp in your area, check out our WordCamp planning site.
  • If you’re interested in starting a WordPress meetup in your area, let us know and we can set up a group on meetup.com for you.
  • And speaking of WordCamp videos, we’ve recently enabled volunteer-generated subtitles/closed captioning of the videos on WordPress.tv to make them more accessible. Interested in helping? Check out the WordPress.tv subtitling instructions.

It’s time for our third annual user and developer survey! If you’re a WordPress user, developer, or business, we want your feedback. Just like previous years, we’ll share the data at the upcoming WordCamp San Francisco (WCSF). Results will also be sent to each survey respondent.

It only takes a few minutes to fill out the survey, which will provide an overview of how people use WordPress.

If you missed past State of the Word keynotes, be sure to check out them out for survey results from 2011 and 2012.

Speaking of WCSF, if you didn’t get a ticket or are too far away to attend, you can still get a ticket for the live stream! Watch the live video stream from the comfort of your home on July 26 and 27; WCSF t-shirt, or any shirt, optional.

I hope to see you there.

All around the globe today, people are celebrating the 10th anniversary of the first WordPress release, affectionately known as #wp10. Watching the feed of photos, tweets, and posts from Auckland to Zambia is incredible; from first-time bloggers to successful WordPress-based business owners, people are coming out in droves to raise a glass and share the “holiday” with their local communities. With hundreds of parties going on today, it’s more visible than ever just how popular WordPress has become.

Thank you to everyone who has ever contributed to this project: your labors of love made this day possible.

But today isn’t just about reflecting on how we got this far (though I thought Matt’s reflection on the first ten years was lovely). We are constantly moving forward. As each release cycle begins and ends (3.6 will be here soon, promise!), we always see an ebb and flow in the contributor pool. Part of ensuring the longevity of WordPress means mentoring new contributors, continually bringing new talent and fresh points of view to our family table.

I am beyond pleased to announce that this summer we will be mentoring 8 interns, most of them new contributors, through Google Summer of Code and the Gnome Outreach Program for Women. Current contributors, who already volunteer their time working on WordPress, will provide the guidance and oversight for a variety of exciting projects  this summer. Here are the people/projects involved in the summer internships:

  • Ryan McCue, from Australia, working on a JSON-based REST API. Mentors will be Bryan Petty and Eric Mann, with a reviewer assist from Andrew Norcross.
  • Kat Hagan, from the United States, working on a Post by Email plugin to replace the core function. Mentors will be Justin Shreve and George Stephanis, with an assist from Peter Westwood.
  • Siobhan Bamber, from Wales, working on a support (forums, training, documentation) internship. Mentors will be Mika Epstein and Hanni Ross.
  • Frederick Ding, from the United States, working on improving portability. Mentors will be Andrew Nacin and Mike Schroder.
  • Sayak Sakar, from India, working on porting WordPress for WebOS to Firefox OS. Mentor will be Eric Johnson.
  • Alex Höreth, from Germany, working on  adding WordPress native revisions to the theme and plugin code editors. Mentors will be Dominik Schilling and Aaron Campbell, with a reviewer assist from Daniel Bachhuber.
  • Mert Yazicioglu, from Turkey, working on ways to improve our community profiles at profiles.wordpress.org. Mentors will be Scott Reilly and Boone Gorges.
  • Daniele Maio, from Italy, working on a native WordPress app for Blackberry 10. Mentor will be Danilo Ercoli.

Did you notice that our summer cohort is as international as the #wp10 parties going on today? I can only think that this is a good sign.

It’s always a difficult process to decide which projects to mentor through these programs. There are always more applicants with interesting ideas with whom we’d like to work than there are opportunities. Luckily, WordPress is a free/libre open source software project, and anyone can begin contributing at any time. Is this the year for you? We’d love for you to join us as we work toward #wp20. ;)