100mdashThe concept I have for you today is actually really simple and talks about the issue of recognizing a scam when it’s being offered to you.

These days, there are a lot of different products and services targeted towards people who are looking for new ways to make money online.

“Making money online” is actually a huge niche. There are hundreds of different approaches at it. Some require more work, others less. Some revolve around freelancing, others have a more passive income driven nature. Some feature tangible products sold online, others just simple digital products.

And every one of those approaches is a possible, genuine path to making money.

However.

Some people – marketers – like to play on our emotions and offer crappy products that have no possible chance of making us any money whatsoever. And at the same time they try to say that if we fail, it’s only our fault.

I have two main methods of finding out if I’m dealing with a scam or a genuine product.

Rule #1: The Olympics Rule

“Is someone saying that you can win the Olympics tomorrow?”

Basically, nothing happens overnight. A rule as valid in internet marketing as anywhere else.

Winning the Olympics is a metaphor for achieving extraordinary result in a relatively short span of time.

When it comes to the Olympics, we all know that winning any competition is not possible without a lifetime of training.

So why aren’t we equally as connected with the reality in other aspects of life? Why do we believe that becoming rich overnight, for some reason, is possible to everyone?

That is why I advise you to ask the above question every time you get presented with a sales pitch of any kind.

If the marketer promises you “the gold medal” overnight then they’re probably not being very honest.

Rule #2: The “It’s Your Fault” Rule

“If you fail, it’s your fault because you didn’t put enough effort.”

Marketers don’t usually say it openly like that, but they can say something like this, for example:

“My product is not the magic pill solution, and it won’t do wonders for you if you don’t take sufficient action putting my advice in practice.”

Notice the “is not the magic pill” part. What it does is actually makes them even more credible because they’re answering the main objection you – the customer – might have.

However, the crown bullshit phrase is this: “won’t do wonders for you if you don’t take sufficient action.” What it actually means is “it’s your fault if you fail.”

I’m sorry, but this is not the case in the normal people’s world. If I buy an iPad and the thing breaks down a week later just like that then it’s most certainly not my fault. It’s the product’s fault.

This is something I talked about in one of my recent posts (the so-called quality product creation). The basic rule is that the main task of a quality product is to deliver the average result to everyone. And if the average customer fails to get any worthwhile results then the product is simply crap (not the other way around).

That’s why there’s no genuine “get rich” product. If it were, the majority of the people who bought it would be rich.

What about non-scams?

Sure, there are genuine products, but they’re a lot less popular due to their realistic promises.

Basically, the Olympics rule applies here too. As I said, if someone promises that you can win it overnight then they’re trying to trick you.

But if they promise that you can start your training tomorrow and then after years of dedicated work make it into the Olympics and maybe win the gold then it’s a completely different story.

In other words, focus on products that teach how to make the next step (or the first step, if you’re just starting out with something), and avoid products that talk about achieving the end result overnight.

Why am I even writing this? Because I’m kind of tired of seeing yet another big thing meant to make online business owners more successful when in fact it only makes them spend money on something they don’t need and won’t ever use.


The Olympics Rule to Recognize a Scam | newInternetOrder.com

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